Thursday
Jan272011

January 2011 Updates for PSWs

Reinstatement Fees for former members are now $200.00 as of January 1, 2011. This includes a new transcript, Diploma, Membership Card, Critical Care Insurance Policy for all registered and discounted continuous learning credits.

NACCPSW now offers benefits for self-employed CPSWs including Professional and General Liability Insurance for $5 million.

NACCPSW is also starting a new recruitment initiative in the coming weeks!  We will be actively recruiting PSWs and promoting the benfits of a membership with the NACCPSW.  While we will be phoning PSWs who are already in our database, this special offer is available to any and all PSWs in Canada!

Thursday
Jan272011

Gail Acton's Overview of the Health Care System - Part One

Overview to 1990

Canada’s health care system has been shaped since Confederation in 1867.  The BNA Act made no mention of welfare measures, and neither the federal nor provincial governments were concerned with either income security or social service programs.  If an individual were in need, he or she relied on religious organizations or private charities. Health care was the responsibility of the individual. Because health and welfare were not assigned to the federal government, it became the jurisdiction of the provincial government. This is why Canada has a split federal-provincial responsibility for health care.

Community care was present in Canadian society long before the health care system was created and existed largely on a volunteer basis.

In the 1950’s, during the economic upturn after the Depression, assistance for hospital construction was established. Hospitals emerged across the country and became the central focus for health care, and a complete departure from community care.

In 1957, Hospital Insurance, a Diagnostic Services Act, ensured hospital care for the entire population, and at this time the Federal government agreed to share all costs of running acute care hospitals, but medical care outside the hospitals was not covered.

In 1968, the Medical Care Act was implemented with provincial and national insurance for physician’s services. With increased demand on the services, some provinces introduced extra billing by physicians and hospital user fees to cover the costs.

In 1984, the Canada Health Act passed and ended these extra billing services. With threats to the survival of Medicare, the federal government re-entered funding with significant budget transfers in 1999 to the provinces for health care.  Although Canada funded an equitable insurance system, it did not choose to establish socialist medicine. Physicians are mostly paid fee for service, and operate as private entrepreneurs with their income guaranteed by the government. The system is provider driven, and not user or patient driven.

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This post is an excerpt from Gail Acton's comprehensive report on the health care system in Canada.  Please click here to read the report in its entirety.  Gail Acton comments on many different aspects of the industry and provides recommendations for where improvements can be made.

Thursday
Dec232010

Benefit Plan for PSWs 2011

NEW VALUE ADDED MEMBER BENEFIT PLAN GIVEN TO ALL GRADUATES OF PSW Program

ONE TIME OFFER-ALL CURRENT GRADUATES  FEES HELD AT $75.00 AND INCLUDED IN YOUR EXAM FEE. NACC/PSWs HAVE OPEN ENROLMENT –JOIN MEMBERSHIP BY FILLING OUT THE DATA SHEET FOR OPEN ENROLMENT

ALL EXAM FEES WILL BE INCREASED TO $200.00 WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE NEW MEMBERSHIP FEE OF $115.00 EFFECTIVE JANUARY 2011

ACCREDITATION FEE INCLUSIVE OF PRIOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE AND REVIEWS, DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATION-$200.00

EXAM FEES $200.00

REINSTATEMENT FEES FOR BENEFIT PLAN $150.00 (2 YEARS BACK FEES @$75.00 A YEAR)

Thursday
Dec232010

Who is NACC/PSW

The NACC/PSW is a member driven, non-profit association, aided by an Executive Director and office staff. 

 NACC/PSW representatives are active volunteers from the identified members of the NACC/PSW membership, who organize, provide leadership, and serve as advocates of the profession in our rapidly changing social and political environment.

 The NACC/PSW leads its membership in presenting and promoting a professional image to government, employers, the public, educational institutions, business, and to other Health Care professions.

 

 

Thursday
Dec232010

Changes to proof of language requirements will help better position newcomers to adapt to Canada’s labour market

One of the most important factors contributing to an immigrant’s economic success is the ability to speak one of Canada’s official languages. Under changes to the Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) Program and the Canadian Experience Class, all new applicants are required to include the results of an English or French language test as part of their application. The language requirements themselves, however, are not changing.

Previously, applicants had the option of proving their language ability through a language test or a written submission. The written submission was intended for people whose first language was English or French. However, non-native English and French speakers frequently used this option – in many cases, using someone else’s writing sample – making it difficult for visa officers to perform an accurate assessment of the applicant’s true language ability.

An independent language test is the fairest, most transparent, objective, consistent and accurate way to evaluate an applicant’s language skills. Language ability will be assessed by accredited testing agencies rather than the visa officer. All applicants are evaluated against the same standards, no matter what their language of origin, nationality or ethnicity.

The change is intended to benefit both immigrants and Canada’s economy by improving the outcomes for newcomers. Research has shown that language proficiency is a key determinant of an immigrant’s labour market success. A 2005 Statistics Canada study found that employment rates for immigrants increased with their ability to speak English and that language proficiency had the biggest impact on their ability to find employment in a high-skilled job or in their intended field.

In addition, skilled workers admitted to Canada under new selection criteria introduced with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) have employment earnings that are as high as double those of skilled workers admitted under the old selection criteria. Much of the increase in wages is attributed to the greater emphasis on stronger official language skills under the selection criteria that accompanied IRPA.

This change also brings Canadian requirements for proof of language proficiency closer to those of other countries. Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, Canada’s main competitors for skilled workers, all require the results of an independent language test. The strong performance of skilled worker immigrants in these countries has been attributed in part to their stringent language requirements.

With the results of a language test, FSW applicants will know before they apply exactly how many points they will be awarded for language ability on the federal skilled worker selection grid. Canadian Experience Class applicants will also know in advance if they meet the minimum language requirements necessary as part of their application. In keeping with the Action Plan for Faster Immigration, processing times are expected to improve because the visa officer simply assigns points based on the language test result instead of taking the time to review a written submission. Finally, many regulatory bodies and industry sectors require language testing or other proof of language assessment, so in taking the test, applicants are one step further on the path to integration into the Canadian labour market.

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