Saturday
Feb262011

Gail Acton's Overview of the Health Care System - Part Three

IN 2000 THE FIRST MINISTERS’ MEETING IDENTIFIED ISSUES SUCH AS:

  • Timely access to health care
  • Health promotion and disease prevention
  • The structure and function of primary care services
  • The shortage of health care professionals
  • The cost and management of medications, health information, and electronic health records
  • Lack of accountability in the health care system

IN 2003-THE OVERRIDING COMMITMENT MADE WAS TO PRESERVE UNIVERSAL HEALTH CARE UNDER THE CURRENT CANADA HEALTH ACT.

Recent initiatives in health care include implementing primary health care reform, expanding insured services to home and community care, building a nationwide computerized system for electronic health records, information sharing, and ensuring sufficient health care professionals are available to meet the needs of Canadians in the future.

  • Currently the health care system must cope with a growing need for funding, and escalating administrative costs
  • a tsunami of aging and long term care needs
  • increased costs of comfort needs for a frail elderly population
  • advancing but expensive technologies
  • an expectation of entitlement among Canadians resulting in over- use and abuse of the systems.
  • solutions to the structures that exist in Home Care
  • elimination of services that are duplicated, poorly managed, overpaid and not effective 

In Ontario, we have 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) regionally which distribute funding for the areas they serve responding to the region's specific health care needs. LHINs are responsible for hospitals, Community Care Access Centres, community support service organizations, mental health and addiction agencies, CHCs, and long term care homes. They also have control over 2/3 of the Ontario health care budget.

We have 50 CHCs across the province. Ten Aboriginal health care centres, and two other health care centres located in Timmins and Toronto, also give services for Aboriginals that provide cultural based health care centres. In addition, in 2004, introduced were non-profit, community-governed teams of health care professionals who deliver a wide range of services based on community needs.

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This post is an excerpt from Gail Acton's comprehensive report on the health care system in Canada.  Please click here to read the report in its entirety.  Gail Acton comments on many different aspects of the industry and provides recommendations for where improvements can be made.

Wednesday
Feb232011

Gail Acton's Overview of the Health Care System - Part Two

1990's and Discontent with the System

New research showed that the decline in mortality since the turn of the century was due to public health measures, such as a standard of living, and not due to medical interventions.
 
Medicine was not as scientific as the public believed, and patterns of medical practice differed with physicians. Fee for service to physicians was less than optimal when no one saw the bill or understood the billing process or limits. The main concept was that spending more money on health care would not necessarily enhance the health of the population. Old age, that was resolvable through medical care and medicine, really had no cures for the chronic conditions of older populations.
 
Many conditions occurred due to physician intervention, and so provinces increasing services to older people often had a negative consequence resulting from medicine itself. Consequently, there came a new vision of reform for Canada's Health Care System.
 
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This post is an excerpt from Gail Acton's comprehensive report on the health care system in Canada.  Please click here to read the report in its entirety.  Gail Acton comments on many different aspects of the industry and provides recommendations for where improvements can be made.
Thursday
Jan272011

January 2011 Updates for PSWs

Reinstatement Fees for former members are now $200.00 as of January 1, 2011. This includes a new transcript, Diploma, Membership Card, Critical Care Insurance Policy for all registered and discounted continuous learning credits.

NACCPSW now offers benefits for self-employed CPSWs including Professional and General Liability Insurance for $5 million.

NACCPSW is also starting a new recruitment initiative in the coming weeks!  We will be actively recruiting PSWs and promoting the benfits of a membership with the NACCPSW.  While we will be phoning PSWs who are already in our database, this special offer is available to any and all PSWs in Canada!

Thursday
Jan272011

Gail Acton's Overview of the Health Care System - Part One

Overview to 1990

Canada’s health care system has been shaped since Confederation in 1867.  The BNA Act made no mention of welfare measures, and neither the federal nor provincial governments were concerned with either income security or social service programs.  If an individual were in need, he or she relied on religious organizations or private charities. Health care was the responsibility of the individual. Because health and welfare were not assigned to the federal government, it became the jurisdiction of the provincial government. This is why Canada has a split federal-provincial responsibility for health care.

Community care was present in Canadian society long before the health care system was created and existed largely on a volunteer basis.

In the 1950’s, during the economic upturn after the Depression, assistance for hospital construction was established. Hospitals emerged across the country and became the central focus for health care, and a complete departure from community care.

In 1957, Hospital Insurance, a Diagnostic Services Act, ensured hospital care for the entire population, and at this time the Federal government agreed to share all costs of running acute care hospitals, but medical care outside the hospitals was not covered.

In 1968, the Medical Care Act was implemented with provincial and national insurance for physician’s services. With increased demand on the services, some provinces introduced extra billing by physicians and hospital user fees to cover the costs.

In 1984, the Canada Health Act passed and ended these extra billing services. With threats to the survival of Medicare, the federal government re-entered funding with significant budget transfers in 1999 to the provinces for health care.  Although Canada funded an equitable insurance system, it did not choose to establish socialist medicine. Physicians are mostly paid fee for service, and operate as private entrepreneurs with their income guaranteed by the government. The system is provider driven, and not user or patient driven.

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This post is an excerpt from Gail Acton's comprehensive report on the health care system in Canada.  Please click here to read the report in its entirety.  Gail Acton comments on many different aspects of the industry and provides recommendations for where improvements can be made.

Thursday
Dec232010

Benefit Plan for PSWs 2011

NEW VALUE ADDED MEMBER BENEFIT PLAN GIVEN TO ALL GRADUATES OF PSW Program

ONE TIME OFFER-ALL CURRENT GRADUATES  FEES HELD AT $75.00 AND INCLUDED IN YOUR EXAM FEE. NACC/PSWs HAVE OPEN ENROLMENT –JOIN MEMBERSHIP BY FILLING OUT THE DATA SHEET FOR OPEN ENROLMENT

ALL EXAM FEES WILL BE INCREASED TO $200.00 WHICH WILL INCLUDE THE NEW MEMBERSHIP FEE OF $115.00 EFFECTIVE JANUARY 2011

ACCREDITATION FEE INCLUSIVE OF PRIOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE AND REVIEWS, DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATION-$200.00

EXAM FEES $200.00

REINSTATEMENT FEES FOR BENEFIT PLAN $150.00 (2 YEARS BACK FEES @$75.00 A YEAR)

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